Hardest things to do in pro golf explains One of the Luke List? 2021

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Hardest things to do in pro golf explains
Hardest things to do in pro golf explains

Hardest things to do in pro golf explains The grind of playing on the PGA Tour is real. Sure, the money can be good, if you are making cuts. But there’s travel, there’s staying in shape, there’s sponsor and family obligations. It all adds up. hardest things to do in pro golf explains

Balancing all that comes with being a pro golfer is crucial for pros. In this week’s Subpar Podcast, Luke List joined hosts Drew Stoltz and Colt Knost to discuss what it’s like getting on Tour, staying there, the distance debate and plenty more.

List, 35, has won twice on the Korn Ferry Tour, although he’s yet to win on the PGA Tour despite nearly $9 million in career earnings. Referencing his 2018 Honda Classic playoff loss to Justin Thomas, Stoltz asked List if one of the hardest things about playing pro golf is staying excited, making goals and not becoming complacent.

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“Tiger is the exception, right,” List said. “He’s the bar. How he’s been able to push himself after winning so much just blows my mind. That’s so much inner-strength to be able to do that and mental fortitude to keep going. I mean, he’s achieved everything there is and he’s still out there grinding; that’s so cool.

“For me, I haven’t done all the stuff, so I want to strive to keep going.”

Stoltz added how it could be easy for some pros to become lethargic.

“It can be,” List said. “Everything is kind of about maximizing your opportunities and maximizing your time-management, and I think that’s always been my struggle for different reasons. Now it’s like, you want to be a good father, good husband, good at playing golf, training the right way. But it’s still finding the right balance of that, especially with our lifestyles.”

You can check out the entire Subpar episode with List below.hardest things to do in pro golf explains

hardest things to do in pro golf explains

Four 15-minute warmup routines approved by low-handicappers

Running late for your round, but not so late that you need to rush to the first tee? Well don’t worry, because if you use your time correctly, 15 minutes can be all you need for an effective warmup. Enter GOLF’s resident low-handicaps, who are here to offer some helpful advice, golfer-to-golfer, about how to warm up in a hurry. hardest things to do in pro golf explains

1. Quality, not quantity

Dylan Dethier (+3.3 handicap): If you’re short on time, don’t panic! Hitting 20 balls on the range versus 10 won’t give you any real advantage once you get on the course. Instead, hit a few wedge shots, focusing on contact, and then hit an iron or two, and then rehearse the shot you’ll be hitting off the first tee. A rushed range session can lead to panic. A zen range warm-up, even if it’s 5 minutes, can put you in the right headspace to take on the real course. You can keep stretching (here’s an article to show you the best way to do that) as you go! hardest things to do in pro golf explains

hardest things to do in pro golf explains

2. Speed control putting hardest things to do in pro golf explains

Luke Kerr-Dineen (2.5 handicap): I couldn’t agree with Dylan more. But when I have a handful of minutes before my round, I head straight for the putting green. I take three golf balls, and I do the following:

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From one end of of the putting green, I putt all the way to the fringe on the other end of the putting green. After that, I find a downhill putt between 30 and 50 feet, and hit three putts down the hill to a target (either the fringe, a hole or a golf tee) Then, I gather those golf balls and putt those three golf balls back up the hill to the same distance.

If I still have time, I’ll either do it again or begin hitting a few short putts. It’s not perfect, but it’s a quick way that I’ve found helps me dial-in my speed on lag putts in a hurry. hardest things to do in pro golf explains

3. Go chipping

Josh Sens (2.5 handicap): When I was younger, I’d use that time to chip and putt. Mostly to chip, just so I could get the feel of club-on-ball contact. But now that I’m pushing toward my mid-50s, I spend that time stretching. Hip-loosening. Shoulder-limbering. And then a quick mental exercise, where I remind myself that this game is a helluva lot of fun and that I should treat it as such for the entire day. Swing without fear. Don’t focus on results. That attitude usually lasts at least a couple of holes. hardest things to do in pro golf explains

4. A bit of everything hardest things to do in pro golf explains

Zephyr Melton (6.5 handicap): Quick stretch, five wedges, three irons, two hybrids, five drivers and then roll a few lag putts to get a feel for the speed of the greens. I can’t remember the last time I warmed up for more than 15 minutes, honestly.

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